Boosting Antenatal Care Attendance and Utilization of Clean and Safe Delivery Service Package in Ibanda District

Mar 18, 3 AM

A Project Aimed To Support Maternal And Neonatal Mortality Reduction In Rural Uganda Challenge Every day, 16 women die in Uganda from pregnancy and child birth related causes, 94 babies are stillborn and 81 newborn babies die. This equates to 69,570 deaths each year due to complications during pregnancy, childbirth and in the first month. Simply put, UDHS (2016) shows that maternal mortality rate stands at 336 per 100,000 live births and the neonatal mortality rate at 27 per 1,000 live birth.

 

A Project Aimed To Support Maternal And Neonatal Mortality Reduction In Rural Uganda

Challenge


Every day, 16 women die in Uganda from pregnancy and child birth related causes, 94 babies are stillborn
and 81 newborn babies die. This equates to 69,570 deaths each year due to complications during pregnancy,
childbirth and in the first month. Simply put, UDHS (2016) shows that maternal mortality rate stands at 336
per 100,000 live births and the neonatal mortality rate at 27 per 1,000 live birth. These rates are very high
compared to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) indicative figures where by 2030, the expected
global maternal mortality ratio is less than 70 per 100 000 live births and neonatal mortality to at least as low
as 12 per 1000 live births. In Ibanda district which is located in the south western part of Uganda, the rates
are higher than the national figures (505 per 100,000 live births for MMR and 29 per 1,000 live births for
NMR). Many of these deaths are from causes that are largely preventable, with maternal deaths caused by
four major factors – haemorrhage/bleeding, hypertension, unsafe abortions and sepsis. Babies die mainly
due to complications of prematurity, complications at birth and neonatal infections. In many rural areas,
including in Ibanda district, maternal and child health service outcomes are determined by an interplay of
issues like inadequate resources, lack of skilled health workers, cultural beliefs, congested health facilities
and teenage pregnancies.

It is a fact that access to a trained health care worker, along with basic medicines such as antiseptics and
antibiotics, vital equipment and a clean environment to work in, can save the lives of nearly-born and
newborn babies. However, only 57% of births in Uganda occur with the support of a skilled health care worker
and worse still in Ibanda district, only 33% of the births are attended by a skilled birth attendant and many
health facilities are under-equipped and under-staffed.

To stop women and babies dying unnecessarily during labour, birth and the first day and week of life, key
changes in the delivery of basic healthcare are urgently needed. The Government of Uganda has committed
to ending preventable maternal and newborn deaths by 2030 as part of the Sustainable Development Goals
through Every Newborn Action Plan and the National Roadmap for Maternal and Newborn Survival.
However, the Ugandan Ministry of Health’s Strategic Plan suggests that little progress has been made in
terms of improvements in Maternal Health and, more specifically, in reducing maternal mortality to the
committed figures on SDGs.

Solution


A)  Supporting local health care providers with safe delivery materials. This project reaches midwifes
and women with birthing kits and safe childbirth education. Saving the lives of women and infants
is critical to stabilizing families and the entire community. We must continue to educate and
provide resources for safe childbirth until women are no longer afraid to get pregnant and all
infants thrive.
Midwives in rural health facilities will be provided with Backpacks. Midwife Backpack is an
affordable, simple kit designed to help create a clean birthing environment, particularly for home
births. The delivery kit is intended to be used by skilled birth attendants, family members, and
women who give birth unassisted at home. Each kit is intended to protect minimum 10 baby
deliveries.

B)  Providing MAMA KITS to pregnant women in rural areas, who cannot afford basic amenities for a
smooth delivery.
This project is aimed at supporting the efforts made by government and other development partners in
reduction of maternal and neonatal mortality rates in Ibanda district where the rates are higher than the
national average. The project support will focus on optimizing accessibility and utilization of quality safe
motherhood services before, during and after delivery by boosting antenatal care attendance and utilization
of clean and safe delivery service package in all the sub counties in Ibanda District.